Hobby Lobby 1 Obama The Abortionist 0

Hobby Lobby 1 Obama The Abortionist 0

Obama’s probably a little bummed that the Supreme Court overruled his Hobby Lobby contraception mandate. Sociopaths have a tendency to get a little angry when things don’t go their way. They do things, unspeakable things. So far, no leaked word yet from the White House of the unspeakable acts committed there within. His minions are, if anything, loyal. Plus, the people’s house, the White House, has sub-basements, sure to stifle any screams of terror that might emanate from down below. I’ll bet it’s hot down there, very hot. Because Obama’s hot and madder than hell. And he’s angry to boot.

Though the recent Supreme Court’s decision was a big win for Hobby Lobby, there are still thousands upon thousands of people who may be forced by Obamacare to participate in the murder of their own grandchildren. Under the Affordable Care Act, parents can keep their kids on their policy until those children reach the age of 26. And if that child of theirs decides to have an abortion that destroys the life growing in the womb, so be it. Just send the bill to the would-be grandma and grandpa.

Would-be Grandmas and Grandpas do have an out though. They can stop claiming the abortion-minded child as a dependent, thereby forcing the child to seek their own health insurance. That’s probably easier to do once that child has reached 18, but I’m sure that the government would be happy to provide that person with affordable healthcare and even subsidize that healthcare when necessary.

Remember the State of the Union in 2009 when Obama said that no federal dollars will be used to fund abortions? I do. I remember. Anyone receiving an Obamacare subsidy though is receiving federal dollars, federal tax money. Money that is taken by force from the U.S. federal government to fund the murderous killing of helpless innocent babies in the womb.

Bob Unruh wrote about the Supreme Court Hobby Lobby vs. Obamacare decision over at WND:

The U.S. Supreme Court in a 5-4 decision Monday ruled that a “closely held” for-profit business can opt out of Obamacare’s controversial contraception requirement based on religious objections.

Hobby Lobby’s argument was based on the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, or RFRA, which protects the individual beliefs of citizens.

The majority opinion by Justice Samuel Alito dismissed the Department of Health and Human Services argument that the companies cannot sue because they are for-profit corporations and that the owners cannot sue because the regulations apply only to the companies. Alito said that “would leave merchants with a difficult choice: give up the right to seek judicial protection of their religious liberty or forgo the benefits of operating as corporations.”

The opinion said the RFRA’s text “shows that Congress designed the statute to provide very broad protection for religious liberty and did not intend to put merchants to such a choice.”

Alito said “the purpose of extending rights to corporations is to protect the rights of people associated with the corporation, including shareholders, officers, and employees.”

“Protecting the free-exercise rights of closely held corporations thus protects the religious liberty of humans who own and control them.”

The opinion said while the dissent argues RFRA does not cover Conestoga, Hobby Lobby and Mardel, an affiliate company of Hobby Lobby, because they cannot “exercise religion,” the justices “offer no persuasive explanation for this conclusion.”

“The corporate form alone cannot explain it because RFRA indisputable protects nonprofit corporations. And the profit-making objective of the corporations cannot explain it because the court has entertained the free-exercise claims of individuals who were attempting to make a profit as retail merchants.”

The court said that “business practices compelled or limited by the tenets of a religious doctrine fall comfortably within the understanding of the ‘exercise of religion.’”

While the court ruling was not a sweeping First Amendment freedom of religion ruling, it concluded: “HHS’s contraceptive mandate substantially burdens the exercise of religion.”

“It requires the Hahns and Greens to engage in conduct that seriously violates their sincere religious belief that life begins at conception.”

The opinion made clear the priority of protecting religion.

“RFRA’s question is whether the mandate imposes a substantial burden on the objecting parties’ ability to conduct business in accordance with their religious beliefs. … It is not for the court to say that the religious beliefs of the plaintiffs are mistaken or unreasonable.”

Joining Alito were Chief Justice John Roberts, whose determination two years that Obamacare was a tax saved the law, Antonin Scalia, Anthony Kennedy and Clarence Thomas.

The opinion concluded that if the government is demanding free abortion-inducing drugs for women, it should pay for them.

Continue reading at WND

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